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Studies from Y.H. Chen and Colleagues Yield New Information about Vitamin D Deficiency (Vitamin D deficiency impairs neurobehavioral development in...

Health & Medicine Week

10-20-17

Studies from Y.H. Chen and Colleagues Yield New Information about Vitamin D Deficiency (Vitamin D deficiency impairs neurobehavioral development in male mice)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Health & Medicine Week -- Investigators publish new report on Nutritional and Metabolic Diseases and Conditions - Vitamin D Deficiency. According to news reporting from Anhui, People's Republic of China, by NewsRx journalists, research stated, "Vitamin D deficiency is prevalent especially in pregnant women and children. Several studies found that vitamin D status was negatively correlated with risk of senile neurobehavioral abnormality."

Financial support for this research came from National Natural Science Foundation of China (see also Nutritional and Metabolic Diseases and Conditions - Vitamin D Deficiency).

The news correspondents obtained a quote from the research, "The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of vitamin D deficiency on neurobehavioral development in mice. In vitamin D deficiency group, dams and their male pups were fed with vitamin D deficient (VDD) diet, in which vitamin D was depleted. Anxiety-related behavior, depressive-like behavior, spatial learning and memory were measured. As expected, serum 25(OH)D level was reduced in VDD diet-fed mice. An anhedonia state, a key depressive-like behavior, was observed in VDD diet-fed mice. In open-field test, peripheral time was decreased and internal time was increased in VDD diet-fed mice. In elevated plus maze, the latency of the first entry into open arms was increased and the number of crossing in open arms was elevated in VDD diet-fed mice. Morris Water Maze showed that VDD-fed mice showed longer escape latency in the first six days. On the seventh day, escape latency was increased in VDD diet-fed mice."

According to the news reporters, the research concluded: "These results provide evidence that vitamin D deficiency impairs neurobehavioral development."

For more information on this research see: Vitamin D deficiency impairs neurobehavioral development in male mice. Physiology & Behavior, 2017;179():333-339. Physiology & Behavior can be contacted at: Pergamon-Elsevier Science Ltd, The Boulevard, Langford Lane, Kidlington, Oxford OX5 1GB, England. (Elsevier - www.elsevier.com; Physiology & Behavior - www.journals.elsevier.com/physiology-and-behavior/)

Our news journalists report that additional information may be obtained by contacting Y.H. Chen, Anhui Prov Key Lab Populat Hlth & Aristogen, Hefei, Anhui, People's Republic of China. Additional authors for this research include L. Fu, X. Chen, S. Xu, Z. Yu and D.X. Xu.

The direct object identifier (DOI) for that additional information is: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.physbeh.2017.07.017. This DOI is a link to an online electronic document that is either free or for purchase, and can be your direct source for a journal article and its citation.

Keywords for this news article include: Anhui, People's Republic of China, Asia, Nutritional and Metabolic Diseases and Conditions, Deficiency Diseases and Conditions, Vitamin D Deficiency, Nutrition Disorders, Malnutrition, Avitaminosis.

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2017, NewsRx LLC

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