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Recent Findings from University of Nottingham Provide New Insights into Diet and Nutrition (Nutrient modulation in the management of disease-induced...

Health & Medicine Week

10-24-17

Recent Findings from University of Nottingham Provide New Insights into Diet and Nutrition (Nutrient modulation in the management of disease-induced muscle wasting: evidence from human studies)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Health & Medicine Week -- Researchers detail new data in Diet and Nutrition. According to news reporting from Derby, United Kingdom, by NewsRx journalists, research stated, "In addition to being essential for movement, skeletal muscles act as both a store and source of key macronutrients. As such, muscle is an important tissue for whole body homeostasis, undergoing muscle wasting in times of starvation, disease, and stress, for example, to provide energy substrates for other tissues."

The news correspondents obtained a quote from the research from the University of Nottingham, "Yet, muscle wasting is also associated with disability, comorbidities, and mortality. As nutrition is so crucial to maintaining muscle homeostasis 'in health', it has been postulated that muscle wasting in cachexia syndromes may be alleviated by nutritional interventions. This review will highlight recent work in this area in relation to muscle kinetics, the acute metabolic (e.g. dietary protein), and longer-term effects of dietary interventions. Whole body and skeletal muscle protein synthesis invariably exhibit deranged kinetics (favouring catabolism) in wasting states; further, many of these conditions harbour blunted anabolic responses to protein nutrition compared with healthy controls. These derangements underlie muscle wasting. Recent trials of essential amino acid and protein-based nutrition have shown some potential for therapeutic benefit. Nutritional modulation, particularly of dietary amino acids, may have benefits to prevent or attenuate disease-induced muscle wasting."

According to the news reporters, the research concluded: "Nonetheless, there remains a lack of recent studies exploring these key concepts to make conclusive recommendations."

For more information on this research see: Nutrient modulation in the management of disease-induced muscle wasting: evidence from human studies. Current Opinion In Clinical Nutrition and Metabolic Care, 2017;20(6):433-439. (Lippincott Williams and Wilkins - www.lww.com; Current Opinion In Clinical Nutrition and Metabolic Care - journals.lww.com/co-clinicalnutrition/pages/default.aspx)

Our news journalists report that additional information may be obtained by contacting M.S. Brook, MRC-ARUK Centre for Musculoskeletal Ageing Research, Clinical, Metabolic and Molecular Physiology, National Institute for Health Research Biomedical Research Centre, University of Nottingham, Royal Derby Hospital, Derby, UK. Additional authors for this research include D.J. Wilkinson and P.J Atherton (see also Diet and Nutrition).

The direct object identifier (DOI) for that additional information is: https://doi.org/10.1097/MCO.0000000000000413. This DOI is a link to an online electronic document that is either free or for purchase, and can be your direct source for a journal article and its citation.

Keywords for this news article include: Derby, Europe, United Kingdom, Diet and Nutrition.

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