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New Dementia Study Findings Have Been Reported by Researchers at Erasmus MC University Medical Center Rotterdam (Vitamin D and the Risk of Dementia:...

Mental Health Weekly Digest

11-03-17

New Dementia Study Findings Have Been Reported by Researchers at Erasmus MC University Medical Center Rotterdam (Vitamin D and the Risk of Dementia: The?Rotterdam Study)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Mental Health Weekly Digest -- Data detailed on Neurodegenerative Diseases and Conditions - Dementia have been presented. According to news reporting out of Rotterdam, Netherlands, by NewsRx editors, research stated, "Vitamin D has gained interest as a potentially modifiable risk factor for dementia because of its putative neuroprotective effects. However, longitudinal studies examining the association between vitamin D and dementia have provided inconsistent results."

Our news journalists obtained a quote from the research from Erasmus MC University Medical Center Rotterdam, "To determine the relationship of serum vitamin D with prevalent and incident dementia in the general population. Within the prospective Rotterdam Study, we measured serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations between 1997 and 2001 using electrochemiluminescence-immunoassay in 6220 participants 55 years or older. We assessed dementia at baseline and continuously during follow-up until 1 January 2015. We used appropriate regression models to determine the relationship of vitamin D with prevalent and incident dementia, including Alzheimer's disease (AD). We adjusted models for age, sex, and season of blood collection. Additionally, we adjusted for ethnicity, education, cardiovascular risk factors, serum calcium, kidney function, depression, outdoor-activity and APOEe4 carriership. At baseline, 127 of 6,220 participants had dementia, of whom 97 had AD. Lower vitamin D concentrations were associated with a non-significantly higher prevalence of dementia (adjusted OR, per SD decrease 1.20, 95% CI 0.95;1.52), but not with AD (adjusted OR: 0.97, 95% CI 0.74;1.29). Among 6,087 non-demented participants with 68,884 person-years of follow-up, 795 participants developed dementia, of whom 641 had AD. Lower vitamin D concentrations were associated with higher risk of dementia (adjusted HR, per SD decrease 1.11, 95% CI 1.02;1.20) and AD (adjusted HR: 1.13, 95% CI 1.03;1.24)."

According to the news editors, the research concluded: "Lower serum vitamin D concentrations are associated with a higher incidence of dementia."

For more information on this research see: Vitamin D and the Risk of Dementia: The?Rotterdam Study. Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, 2017;60(3):989-997. Journal of Alzheimer's Disease can be contacted at: IOS Press, Nieuwe Hemweg 6B, 1013 BG Amsterdam, The Netherlands (see also Neurodegenerative Diseases and Conditions - Dementia).

Our news journalists report that additional information may be obtained by contacting S. Licher, Dept. of Epidemiology, Erasmus MC - University Medical Center Rotterdam, Rotterdam, Netherlands. Additional authors for this research include R.FAG. de Bruijn, F.J. Wolters, M.C. Zillikens, M.A. Ikram and M.K Ikram.

The direct object identifier (DOI) for that additional information is: https://doi.org/10.3233/JAD-170407. This DOI is a link to an online electronic document that is either free or for purchase, and can be your direct source for a journal article and its citation.

Publisher contact information for the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease is: IOS Press, Nieuwe Hemweg 6B, 1013 BG Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

Keywords for this news article include: Europe, Dementia, Rotterdam, Netherlands, Alzheimer Disease, Risk and Prevention, Brain Diseases and Conditions, Neurodegenerative Diseases and Conditions, Central Nervous System Diseases and Conditions.

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2017, NewsRx LLC

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