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Researchers at Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences Target Headache and Migraine (Ketorolac versus Magnesium Sulfate in Migraine Headache...

Drug Week

03-31-17

Researchers at Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences Target Headache and Migraine (Ketorolac versus Magnesium Sulfate in Migraine Headache Pain Management; a Preliminary Study)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Drug Week -- Current study results on Nervous System Diseases and Conditions - Headache and Migraine have been published. According to news reporting originating in Tehran, Iran, by NewsRx journalists, research stated, "Migraine is a common cause of emergency department (ED) visits. To date, there is no recommended drug of choice for pain management of these patients."

The news reporters obtained a quote from the research from the Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, "In the present study, we aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of ketorolac and magnesium sulfate in this regard. This is a cross-sectional study performed on all 18 -60 year-old patients, visiting two different EDs with complaint of moderate to severe migraine headache. Patients were treated with 30 mg ketorolac in one hospital and 1 gram magnesium sulfate in the other. Pain scores were assessed on arrival, 1 and 2 hours after drugs administration and quality of pain management was compared between two groups using SPSS 22. 70 patients with the mean age of 36.4 ? 11.4 years were enrolled (51.4% male). The two groups were similar regarding baseline characteristics (p >0.05). The improvement in pain score in magnesium sulfate group was greater than Ketorolac group after both one hour (6 vs 3; p<0.001) and two hours (7 vs 5; p<0.001). It seems that both ketorolac and magnesium sulfate are significantly effective in pain control of patients with migraine headache presenting to the emergency department."

According to the news reporters, the research concluded: "Magnesium sulfate was superior to ketorolac both one and two hours after drug administration."

For more information on this research see: Ketorolac versus Magnesium Sulfate in Migraine Headache Pain Management; a Preliminary Study. Emergency, 2017;5(1):e2. (Wiley-Blackwell - www.wiley.com/; Emergency - onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/(ISSN)1742-6723)

Our news correspondents report that additional information may be obtained by contacting H. Delavar Kasmaei, Dept. of Neurology, Shohadaye Tajrish Hospital, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. Additional authors for this research include M. Amiri, A. Negida, S. Hajimollarabi and N. Mahdavi (see also Nervous System Diseases and Conditions - Headache and Migraine).

Keywords for this news article include: Iran, Asia, Pain, Anticonvulsants, Pharmaceuticals, Tehran, Laxatives, Light Metals, Sulfur Acids, Sulfur Compounds, Ketorolac Therapy, Drugs and Therapies, Inorganic Chemicals, Magnesium Compounds, Headache and Migraine, Gastrointestinal Agents, Ophthalmic Preparations, Cyclooxygenase Inhibitors, Magnesium Sulfate Therapy.

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2017, NewsRx LLC

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