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Findings from Oregon State University Provide New Insights into Diet and Nutrition (A Modified Healthy Aging Index and Its Association with...

Health & Medicine Week

09-29-17

Findings from Oregon State University Provide New Insights into Diet and Nutrition (A Modified Healthy Aging Index and Its Association with Mortality: The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 1999-2002)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Health & Medicine Week -- Investigators discuss new findings in Diet and Nutrition. According to news reporting originating from Corvallis, Oregon, by NewsRx correspondents, research stated, "Comorbidity indices that are based on clinically recognized disease do not capture the full spectrum of health. The Healthy Aging Index (HAI) was recently developed to describe a wider range of health and disease across multiple organ systems."

Our news editors obtained a quote from the research from Oregon State University, "We characterized the distribution of a modified HAI (mHAI) by sociodemographics in a representative sample of the U.S. We also examined the association of the mHAI with mortality across individuals with different levels of clinically recognizable comorbidities. Data are from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (1999-2000, 2001-2002) on 2,451 adults aged 60 years or older. Five mHAI components (systolic blood pressure, Digit Symbol Substitution Test, cystatin C, glucose, and respiratory problems) were scored 0 (healthiest), 1, or 2 (unhealthiest) by sex-specific tertiles or clinically relevant cutoffs and summed to construct the mHAI. The mean mHAI score was 4.3; 20.6% had a score of 0-2. 33.2% had a score of 3-4, 31.0% had a score of 5-6, and 15.2% had a score of 7-10. Mean mHAI scores were lower in adults who were younger, non-Hispanic whites, more educated, and married/living with partner. After multivariate adjustment, per unit higher of the mHAI was associated with higher all-cause mortality (HR = 1.19, 95% CI = 1.11-1.27) and higher cardiovascular mortality (HR = 1.23, 95% CI = 1.11-1.35). Within each comorbidity category (0, 1, 2, 3, 4+), the mHAI was still widely distributed and further stratified mortality. Substantial variation exists in the mHAI across sociodemographic subgroups."

According to the news editors, the research concluded: "The mHAI could provide incremental value for mortality risk prediction beyond clinically diagnosed chronic diseases among elders."

For more information on this research see: A Modified Healthy Aging Index and Its Association with Mortality: The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 1999-2002. Journals of Gerontology Series A-Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences, 2017;72(10):1437-1444. Journals of Gerontology Series A-Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences can be contacted at: Oxford Univ Press Inc, Journals Dept, 2001 Evans Rd, Cary, NC 27513, USA (see also Diet and Nutrition).

The news editors report that additional information may be obtained by contacting C.K. Wu, Oregon State University, Sch Biol & Populat Hlth Sci, Corvallis, OR 97331, United States. Additional authors for this research include E. Smit, J.L. Sanders, A.B. Newman and M.C. Odden.

Keywords for this news article include: Corvallis, Oregon, United States, North and Central America, Diet and Nutrition, Risk and Prevention, Oregon State University.

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