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Recent Research from Temple University Highlight Findings in Heart Failure (Long-Term Caloric Restriction Improves Cardiac Function, Remodeling,...

Cardiovascular Week

04-13-18

Recent Research from Temple University Highlight Findings in Heart Failure (Long-Term Caloric Restriction Improves Cardiac Function, Remodeling, Adrenergic Responsiveness, and Sympathetic Innervation in a Model of Postischemic Heart Failure)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Cardiovascular Week -- Current study results on Heart Disorders and Diseases - Heart Failure have been published. According to news reporting originating in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, by NewsRx journalists, research stated, "Caloric restriction (CR) has been described to have cardioprotective effects and improve functional outcomes in animal models and humans. Chronic ischemic heart failure (HF) is associated with reduced cardiac sympathetic innervation, dysfunctional beta-adrenergic receptor signaling, and decreased cardiac inotropic reserve."

The news reporters obtained a quote from the research from Temple University, "We tested the effects of a long-term CR diet, started late after myocardial infarction on cardiac function, sympathetic innervation, and beta-adrenergic receptor responsiveness in a rat model of postischemic HF. Adult male rats were randomly assigned to myocardial infarction or sham operation and 4 weeks later were further randomized to a 1-year CR or normal diet. One year of CR resulted in a significant reduction in body weight, heart weight, and heart weight/tibia length ratio when compared with normal diet in HF groups. At the end of the study period, echocardiography and histology revealed that HF animals under the CR diet had ameliorated left ventricular remodeling compared with HF rats fed with normal diet. Invasive hemodynamic showed a significant improvement of cardiac inotropic reserve in CR HF rats compared with HF-normal diet animals. Importantly, CR dietary regimen was associated with a significant increase of cardiac sympathetic innervation and with normalized cardiac beta-adrenergic receptor levels in HF rats when compared with HF rats on the standard diet. We demonstrate, for the first time, that chronic CR, when started after HF established, can ameliorate cardiac dysfunction and improve inotropic reserve."

According to the news reporters, the research concluded: "At the molecular level, we find that chronic CR diet significantly improves sympathetic cardiac innervation and beta-adrenergic receptor levels in failing myocardium."

For more information on this research see: Long-Term Caloric Restriction Improves Cardiac Function, Remodeling, Adrenergic Responsiveness, and Sympathetic Innervation in a Model of Postischemic Heart Failure. Circulation-Heart Failure, 2018;11(3):8-33. Circulation-Heart Failure can be contacted at: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Two Commerce Sq, 2001 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19103, USA (see also Heart Disorders and Diseases - Heart Failure).

Our news correspondents report that additional information may be obtained by contacting W.J. Koch, Temple University, Lewis Katz Sch Med, Dept. of Pharmacol, Philadelphia, PA 19140, United States. Additional authors for this research include G. Gambino, L. Petraglia, A. Elia, K. Komici, G.D. Femminella, M.L. D'Amico, R. Formisano, G. Borghetti, D. Liccardo, M. Nolano, S.R. Houser, D. Leosco, N. Ferrara, C. de Lucia and G. Rengo.

Keywords for this news article include: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States, North and Central America, Cardiovascular Diseases and Conditions, Heart Disorders and Diseases, Catecholamine Receptors, Adrenergic Receptors, Health and Medicine, Caloric Restriction, Diet and Nutrition, Membrane Proteins, beta Receptors, Heart Failure, Heart Disease, Cardiology, Temple University.

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