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Diet rich in taurine, cysteine, folate, B12 and betaine may lessen risk for Alzheimer’s disease by boosting brain synthesis of hydrogen sulfide

Disease Prevention Daily

2019 NOV 07 (NewsRx) -- By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Disease Prevention Daily -- Investigators publish new report on Neurodegenerative Diseases and Conditions - Alzheimer Disease. According to news originating from San Diego, California, by NewsRx correspondents, research stated, “The gaseous physiological modulator hydrogen sulfide (HS) has recently been shown to exert a variety of neuroprotective effects. In particular, the treatment of transgenic mouse models of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) with agents that release HS aids preservation of cognitive function, suppresses brain production of amyloid beta, and decreases tau phosphorylation.”

Our news journalists obtained a quote from the research, “The possible physiological relevance of these findings is suggested by the finding that brain and plasma levels of HS are markedly lower in AD patients than matched controls. Hence, nutraceutical strategies which boost brain synthesis or levels of HS may have potential for prevention of AD. The chief enzyme which synthesizes HS in brain parenchyma, cystathionine beta-synthase (CBS), employs cysteine as its rate-limiting substrate, and is allosterically activated by S-adenosylmethionine (SAM). Supplemental taurine has been shown to boost expression of this enzyme, as well as that of another HS source, cystathionine gamma-lyase, in vascular tissue, and to enhance plasma HS levels; in rats subjected to hemorrhagic stroke, co-administration of taurine has been shown to blunt a marked reduction in brain CBS expression. Brain levels of SAM are about half as high in AD patients as in controls, and this is thought to explain the reduction of brain HS in these patients. These considerations suggest that supplementation with cysteine, taurine, and agents which promote methyl group availability -such as SAM, folate, vitamin B, and betaine -may have potential for boosting brain synthesis of HS and thereby aiding AD prevention. Indeed, most of these agents have already demonstrated utility in mouse AD models -albeit the extent to which increased HS synthesis contributes to this protection remains unclear. Moreover, prospective epidemiology has associated low dietary or plasma levels of folate, B12, and taurine with increased dementia risk.”

According to the news editors, the research concluded: “Rodent studies suggest that effective nutraceutical strategies for boosting brain HS synthesis may in fact have broad neuroprotective utility, possibly aiding prevention and/or control not only of AD but also Parkinson’s disease and glaucoma, while diminishing the neuronal damage associated with brain trauma or stroke.”

For more information on this research see: A diet rich in taurine, cysteine, folate, B12 and betaine may lessen risk for Alzheimer’s disease by boosting brain synthesis of hydrogen sulfide. Medical Hypotheses, 2019;132():109356. Medical Hypotheses can be contacted at: Churchill Livingstone, Journal Production Dept, Robert Stevenson House, 1-3 Baxters Place, Leith Walk, Edinburgh EH1 3AF, Midlothian, Scotland. (Elsevier - www.elsevier.com; Medical Hypotheses - http://www.journals.elsevier.com/medical-hypotheses/)

The news correspondents report that additional information may be obtained from M.F. McCarty, Catalytic Longevity, San Diego, CA, United States. Additional authors for this research include J.H. O’Keefe and J.J DiNicolantonio.

The direct object identifier (DOI) for that additional information is: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.mehy.2019.109356. This DOI is a link to an online electronic document that is either free or for purchase, and can be your direct source for a journal article and its citation.

The publisher’s contact information for the journal Medical Hypotheses is: Churchill Livingstone, Journal Production Dept, Robert Stevenson House, 1-3 Baxters Place, Leith Walk, Edinburgh EH1 3AF, Midlothian, Scotland.

(Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world.)