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Blood-based nutritional risk index explains cognitive enhancement and decline in the multidomain Alzheimer prevention trial

Health & Medicine Business Daily

2020 JAN 23 (NewsRx) -- By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Health & Medicine Business Daily -- Fresh data on Neurodegenerative Diseases and Conditions - Alzheimer Disease are presented in a new report. According to news reporting from Lausanne, Switzerland, by NewsRx journalists, research stated, “Multinutrient approaches may produce more robust effects on brain health through interactive qualities. We hypothesized that a blood-based nutritional risk index (NRI) including three biomarkers of diet quality can explain cognitive trajectories in the multidomain Alzheimer prevention trial (MAPT) over 3-years.”

Funders for this research include AbbVie, H. Lundbeck A/S, Meso Scale Diagnostics, Institute of Conservation, Pfizer, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Toulouse, Roche, Avid Radiopharmaceuticals, Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, National Institutes of Health, AstraZeneca, Institute of Conservation, Association France Alzheimer, Les Laboratories Pierre Fabre, Sanofi, Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Biogen, Eli Lilly and Company, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Toulouse, Beaufour Ipsen Pharma, France Alzheimer Association, AMPA Association, Avid, Exonhit, Otsuka, Astra Zeneca, LPG Systems, Nestle, Alzheon, Nestle Institute of Health Sciences, Gerontopole of Toulouse, French Ministry of Health, Pierre Fabre Research Institute, Exhonit Therapeutics SA, Beaufour Ipsen Pharma, AMPA Association, Avid, Exonhit, MSD, Otsuka, LPG Systems, Nestle, Alzheon, Nestle Institute of Health Sciences, Gerontopole of Toulouse, French Ministry of Health, Pierre Fabre Research Institute, Exhonit Therapeutics SA.

The news correspondents obtained a quote from the research from Nestle, “The NRI included erythrocyte n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFA 22:6n-3 and 20:5n-3), serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D, and plasma homocysteine. The NRI scores reflect the number of nutritional risk factors (0-3). The primary outcome in MAPT was a cognitive composite score within each participant that was fit with linear mixed-effects models. Eighty percent had at lease one nutritional risk factor for cognitive decline (NRI 1:573 of 712). Participants presenting without nutritional risk factors (NRI=0) exhibited cognitive enhancement (=0.03 standard units [SU]/y), whereas each NRI point increase corresponded to an incremental acceleration in rates of cognitive decline (NRI-1:=-0.04 SU/y,=.03; NRI-2:=-0.08 SU/y, <.0001; and NRI-3:=-0.11 SU/y,=.0008).”

According to the news reporters, the research concluded: “Identifying and addressing these well-established nutritional risk factors may reduce age-related cognitive decline in older adults; an observation that warrants further study.”

For more information on this research see: A blood-based nutritional risk index explains cognitive enhancement and decline in the multidomain Alzheimer prevention trial. Alzheimer’s & Dementia, 2019;5(C):953-963. (Elsevier - www.elsevier.com; Alzheimer’s & Dementia - http://www.journals.elsevier.com/alzheimers-and-dementia/)

Our news journalists report that additional information may be obtained by contacting G.L. Bowman, Dept. of Nutrition and Brain Health, Nestle, EPFL Campus, Lausanne, Switzerland. Additional authors for this research include H.H. Dodge, S. Guyonnet, N. Zhou, J. Donohue, A. Bichsel, J. Schmitt, C. Hooper, T. Bartfai, S. Andrieu and B. Vellas.

The direct object identifier (DOI) for that additional information is: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.trci.2019.11.004. This DOI is a link to an online electronic document that is either free or for purchase, and can be your direct source for a journal article and its citation.

(Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world.)