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Study Findings on Mononuclear Leukocytes Are Outlined in Reports from Institute of Gerontology (High dietary intake of vitamin C suppresses...

Health & Medicine Week

04-02-15

Study Findings on Mononuclear Leukocytes Are Outlined in Reports from Institute of Gerontology (High dietary intake of vitamin C suppresses age-related thymic atrophy and contributes to the maintenance of immune cells in vitamin C-deficient ...)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Health & Medicine Week -- Investigators publish new report on Immunology. According to news reporting from Tokyo, Japan, by NewsRx journalists, research stated, "Vitamin C (VC) is an essential nutrient for humans and certain other animals. It has antioxidant properties and has been reported to ameliorate oxidative damage to lipids, DNA and proteins."

The news correspondents obtained a quote from the research from the Institute of Gerontology, "However, the effects of VC on immune function are poorly understood, especially the influence of long-term high-dose VC intake on the number and function of immune cells. In the present study, to evaluate the immune effects of VC, VC-deficient senescence marker protein-30 knockout (SMP30KO) mice were fed a diet containing the recommended level of VC (20 mg/kg per d; 0.02% VC) or a high level of VC (200 mg/kg per d; 0.2% VC) for 1 year. The plasma VC concentration of the 0.02% group was the same as that of age-matched C57BL/6 mice after 1 year of feeding; however, plasma VC concentration and thymus weight were significantly higher in the 0.2% VC group than in the 0.02% VC group. The total counts of leucocytes, lymphocytes, granulocytes and monocytes in the peripheral blood, as well as the number of splenocytes and thymocytes, were all significantly higher in the 0.2% VC group than in the 0.02% VC group. In addition, the number of naive T cells in peripheral blood lymphocytes, the number of memory T-cell populations in splenocytes, and the number of cluster of differentiation (CD)4(+)CD8(+) or CD4(+)CD8(-) or CD4(-)CD8(+) T cells in thymocytes were all markedly higher in the 0.2% VC group than in the 0.02% VC group after 1 year of dietary treatment."

According to the news reporters, the research concluded: "These results suggest that a long-term high-dose intake of VC is effective in the maintenance of immune cells, partly through the suppression of age-related thymic involution in VC-deficient SMP30KO mice."

For more information on this research see: High dietary intake of vitamin C suppresses age-related thymic atrophy and contributes to the maintenance of immune cells in vitamin C-deficient senescence marker protein-30 knockout mice. British Journal of Nutrition, 2015;113(4):603-609. British Journal of Nutrition can be contacted at: Cambridge Univ Press, Edinburgh Bldg, Shaftesbury Rd, CB2 8RU Cambridge, England. (Cambridge University Press - www.cambridge.org; British Journal of Nutrition - journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=BJN)

Our news journalists report that additional information may be obtained by contacting R. Uchio, Tokyo Metropolitan Inst Gerontol, Tokyo 1730015, Japan. Additional authors for this research include Y. Hirose, S. Murosaki, Y. Yamamoto and A. Ishigami (see also Immunology).

Keywords for this news article include: Asia, Tokyo, Japan, Vitamin C, Immunology, Lymphocytes, Mononuclear Leukocytes, Hemic and Immune Systems

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2015, NewsRx LLC

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