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Data on Inflammatory Bowel Disease Reported by Researchers at Seoul National University (Vitamin D supplementation partially affects colonic changes in dextran sulfate sodium-induced colitis obese mice but not lean mice)

Obesity Daily News

07-11-19

2019 JUL 10 (NewsRx) -- By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Obesity Daily News -- Research findings on Digestive System Diseases and Conditions - Inflammatory Bowel Disease are discussed in a new report. According to news reporting originating in Seoul, South Korea, by NewsRx journalists, research stated, “Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) often accompanies vitamin D deficiency, and vitamin D supplementation ameliorates IBD symptoms in animal models and humans. Because altered vitamin D metabolism has been reported in obesity, we hypothesized that the effects of vitamin D on the development of IBD would be different between obese and control mice.”

Financial support for this research came from Ministry of Education - Kingdom of Saudi Arabi.

The news reporters obtained a quote from the research from Seoul National University, “Five-week-old male C57BL/6N mice were divided into 4 groups and fed a diet differing in fat content (10% or 45%, normal diet [ND] or high-fat diet [HFD]) and vitamin D content (1000 or 10 000 IU/kg of diet, vDC or vDS) for 14 weeks. At week 13, colitis was induced by administration of 2% dextran sodium sulfate for 7 days. Histology score tended to be lower in the HFD-vDS group than HFD-vDC group, but there was no effect of vitamin D on the ND group. Colonic Cldn1 and Cyp27b1 mRNA levels were higher in the HFD-vDS than HFD-vDC group, but these effects of vitamin D were not observed in the ND group. The serum 25-hydroxy vitamin D levels were negatively correlated with the histology score in the HFD group but not in the ND group. Overall, these results suggest that vitamin D supplementation partially prevents the histological damage of the colon in obese mice but not in control mice.”

According to the news reporters, the research concluded: “This effect might be mediated by increased colonic Cyp27b1 levels, leading to upregulation of local 1,25-dihydroxy vitamin D production.”

For more information on this research see: Vitamin D supplementation partially affects colonic changes in dextran sulfate sodium-induced colitis obese mice but not lean mice. Nutrition Research, 2019;67():90-99. Nutrition Research can be contacted at: Pergamon-Elsevier Science LTD, the Boulevard, Langford Lane, Kidlington, Oxford OX5 1GB, England. (Elsevier - www.elsevier.com; Nutrition Research - http://www.journals.elsevier.com/nutrition-research/)

Our news correspondents report that additional information may be obtained by contacting J.S. Yoo, Dept. of Food and Nutrition, College of Human Ecology, Seoul National University, Seoul, South Korea. Additional authors for this research include C.Y. Park, Y.K. Seo, S.H. Woo, D.Y. Kim and S.N Han.

The direct object identifier (DOI) for that additional information is: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.nutres.2019.03.009. This DOI is a link to an online electronic document that is either free or for purchase, and can be your direct source for a journal article and its citation.

The publisher of the journal Nutrition Research can be contacted at: Pergamon-Elsevier Science LTD, the Boulevard, Langford Lane, Kidlington, Oxford OX5 1GB, England.

(Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world.)

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