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Some types and sources of dietary fiber associated with reduction in depressive symptoms in a general population of adults

Health & Medicine Daily

2020 SEP 29 (NewsRx) -- By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Health & Medicine Daily -- Investigators discuss new findings in Health and Medicine - Diet and Nutrition. According to news reporting originating in Shenyang, People’s Republic of China, by NewsRx journalists, research stated, “This cross-sectional study aimed to examine the associations between dietary fibers (DF) intake and depressive symptoms in a general adult population in Tianjin, China. A total of 24,306 participants (mean age, 41 years; range 18-91 years) were enrolled.”

The news reporters obtained a quote from the research from the Shengjing Hospital of China Medical University, “DF intake was assessed using a validated self-administered food frequency questionnaire. Depressive symptoms were assessed using the Self-Rating Depression Scale. Associations between DF intake and depressive symptoms were estimated using logistic regression analysis. Socio-demographic, behavioral, health status, and dietary factors were adjusted. In men, compared to participants in the lowest quartiles for total, soluble, vegetable, and soy DF, odds ratios (ORs; 95% confidence intervals [CIs]) for depressive symptoms in the highest were 0.83 (0.69, 0.99), 0.74 (0.63, 0.87), 0.79 (0.65, 0.96), and 0.69 (0.60, 0.81), respectively. In women, compared to participants in the lowest quartiles for vegetable and soy DF, the ORs (95% CIs) for depressive symptoms in the highest were 0.77 (0.64, 0.93) and 0.82 (0.70, 0.95), respectively. No association was found between total or soluble DF intake and depressive symptoms in women. No association was found between insoluble, cereal, fruit, or tuber DF intake and depressive symptoms in men and women. Linear associations between DF intake and depressive symptoms were only detected for soy foods DF (men, b=-0.148, p<0.0001; women, b=-0.069, p=0.04). Results suggest intake of soluble, vegetable, and soy DF were inversely associated with depressive symptoms.”

According to the news reporters, the research concluded: “These results should be confirmed through prospective and interventional studies.”

For more information on this research see: Associations between different types and sources of dietary fiber intake and depressive symptoms in a general population of adults: a cross-sectional study. British Journal of Nutrition, 2020;():1-30. British Journal of Nutrition can be contacted at: Cambridge University Press, 32 Avenue of the Americas, New York, NY 10013-2473. (Cambridge University Press - www.cambridge.org; British Journal of Nutrition - http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=BJN)

Our news correspondents report that additional information may be obtained by contacting Yashu Liu, Dept. of Clinical Epidemiology, Shengjing Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang, People’s Republic of China. Additional authors for this research include Yang Xia, Shunming Zhang, Qing Zhang, Li Liu, Ge Meng, Hongmei Wu, Shaomei Sun, Xing Wang, Ming Zhou, Qiyu Jia, Kun Song, Qijun Wu, Kaijun Niu and Yuhong Zhao.

The direct object identifier (DOI) for that additional information is: https://doi.org/10.1017/s0007114520003566. This DOI is a link to an online electronic document that is either free or for purchase, and can be your direct source for a journal article and its citation.

The publisher of the British Journal of Nutrition can be contacted at: Cambridge University Press, 32 Avenue of the Americas, New York, NY 10013-2473.

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