Nutritional therapies for digestive disorders

Nutritional therapies for digestive disorders

Healthy digestion is essential to obtain the nutritional benefits of what we consume. A number of digestive conditions can result in pain or discomfort. Logically, what we consume can either aggravate or help improve these conditions. Life Extension has developed protocols that identify nutritional therapies for digestive disorders that can help improve digestion and alleviate discomfort.

Science and Research About Maintaining Digestive Health

Digestive Health Science & Research

Achieve your optimal digestive health with well-portioned meals, a healthy diet and sensible lifestyle choices.

Frequently Asked Digestive Health Questions

1.
What causes abdominal pain?

Transitory issues, such as constipation, gas, stress or muscle strain, are common causes of abdominal pain. However, there are causes that are more serious as well, such as appendicitis, gallstones, bowel obstruction or kidney infection, to name a few. Since there are multiple organs and conditions that can be involved in abdominal pain, any severe pain should be investigated by a doctor, as well as any mild pain that is persistent or recurring.

2.
How do you improve your intestinal health?

Trillions of bacteria and other microorganisms live inside our intestines. This community, called the microbiome, contains hundreds of different bacterial species. The number, diversity and types of bacteria in our microbiome impact our intestinal health. Eating a high-fiber, plant-based diet with a large variety of fruits and vegetables is one of the best ways to encourage microbial diversity and increase the types of bacteria linked to intestinal health. Since friendly bacteria often eat fiber, taking a microbiome-friendly fiber supplement, known as a prebiotic, is advisable. In addition, supplementing with key beneficial bacteria by taking supplements known as probiotics can also provide benefit.

3.
What is leaky gut syndrome?

Leaky gut, also known as “increased intestinal permeability,” is a term used to indicate a loss of intestinal barrier function, potentially allowing antigenic molecules, such as undigested food particles, microorganisms and toxins, to breach the intestinal wall. This contributes to food allergies, autoimmune reactions and inflammation.

Digestive–General News

Related Digestive Health Science & Research