Nutritional therapies for gout

Nutritional therapies for gout

Gout is a form of arthritis in which excess uric acid forms crystals in the joints and other areas of the body. Blood testing can determine the presence of high uric acid levels (hyperuricemia) associated with gout; however, the presence of monosodium urate crystals in the joints determines a definitive diagnosis. Prescription therapies are often used to support healthy uric acid levels, a healthy inflammatory response and patient comfort. However, dietary changes and nutritional interventions also help support these factors. Find out more in our Gout and Hyperuricemia protocol.

Gout Science & Research

Finding the right information related to a health condition can be daunting. Explore these basic questions about gout. See our gout protocol to delve even deeper into the subject.

Frequently Asked Gout Questions

1.
What are early symptoms of gout?

There are not always early symptoms of gout. The first indication to the affected person that something is wrong may be a gout flare, a painful arthropathy affecting the joints, often a single peripheral joint. However, a blood test may reveal elevated uric acid levels before symptoms emerge. Not everyone who has elevated uric acid levels will experience gout symptoms.

2.
What are treatments for gout and elevated uric acid?

Anti-inflammatory agents may be helpful in the treatment of gout flares. These include glucocorticoids and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Colchicine may be used sometimes as well. Drugs that inhibit IL-1 beta signaling may be helpful, too. Gout flare prevention may entail dietary and lifestyle changes and uric-acid-lowering drugs.

3.
What are the best foods to avoid getting gout?

People with a history of gout are generally advised to limit consumption of purine-rich foods, such as red meat, fish and shellfish. Alcohol consumption should be reduced as well. The diet should focus mostly on plant-based protein sources. Excessive added sugar should be avoided.

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