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Lower vitamin D levels may help explain higher cancer incidence among African Americans

December 16, 2006

In this issue

Life Extension Update Exclusive

Lower vitamin D levels may help explain higher cancer incidence among African-Americans

Health Concern

Pancreatic cancer

Featured Products

Vitamin D3 Capsules

5-Loxin®

Life Extension magazine

Late-breaking news and more on the Life Extension Website, by Dave Tuttle

Life Extension Update Exclusive

Lower vitamin D levels may help explain higher cancer incidence among African-Americans

The December, 2006 issue of the journal Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention published a report by researchers at Harvard Medical School and Harvard School of Public Health which suggests that the reduced levels of vitamin D that often occur among African-Americans could be responsible in part for their greater incidence of cancer and mortality from the disease.

The researchers utilized data from the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study, an ongoing study of heart disease and cancer among male dentists, osteopathic physicians, pharmacists, veterinarians, optometrists and podiatrists. The current study compared 481 black men and 43,468 white men who were aged 40 to 75 years upon enrollment.

Ninety-nine black and 7,019 white men were diagnosed with cancer between 1986 and January, 2002. Black subjects experienced a 32 percent greater risk of cancer and an 89 percent greater risk of dying from the disease than white participants. The risk of dying of a digestive system cancer (oral, esophageal, stomach, pancreas or colorectal cancer, which have been linked with reduced vitamin D levels) was more than double in black participants. When black subjects who had none or only one of the risk factors for vitamin D deficiency (including low vitamin D intake) were compared to a similar group of white subjects, they were not found to have a greater risk of cancer or a much greater risk of dying from the disease, however black subjects with additional risk factors for hypovitaminosis D had a significantly higher risk of cancer incidence and mortality, particularly for digestive system cancers.

Black participants did not experience a higher rate of noncancer mortality than white subjects in this study. The researchers stated that they did not find strong enough differences among dietary and lifestyle factors other than vitamin D to explain the differences in cancer incidence and mortality observed. “In a group of Black male health professionals characterized by high socioeconomic status, high degree of medical knowledge, high use of screening tests, and adherence to a healthful lifestyle and dietary practice comparable with their White counterparts, a marked difference in cancer incidence and especially mortality was found. We identified only vitamin D deficiency as a potential relevant factor,” the authors write. Although the study’s results do not prove that vitamin D is the cause of higher cancer rates experienced by African-Americans, further research may produce more evidence of a causative relationship.

Health Concern

Pancreatic cancer

Pancreatic cancer is a rapidly progressive disease with generally poor survival time. The goal of therapy is to strengthen pancreatic function, impede cancer growth and spread, and reduce the severity of symptoms. Various nutritional supplements outlined in this chapter have been shown to help pancreatic cancer patients by slowing disease progression or increasing quality of life.

  1. Guidelines for Reducing Pancreatic Cancer Risk
  2. Stop smoking and drinking alcohol.
  3. Avoid or reduce exposure to toxic chemicals and petroleum products.
  4. Maintain a healthy body weight.
  5. Reduce dietary intake of fried foods, red meat, and meat products.
  6. Increase intake of fresh fruit and vegetables, fiber, minerals, and vitamins.
  7. Reduce sugar consumption (glycemic load).
  8. Increase physical activity.

Maintain a diet suitable for diabetics that restricts simple carbohydrates such as sugar and emphasizes complex carbohydrates (fibers) and proteins (refer to the Diabetes protocol). Protein supplements such as soy and essential fatty acids such as borage and fish oils will help by altering the dietary intake ratio of carbohydrates, proteins, and fats.

https://www.lifeextension.com/protocols/cancer/pancreatic_01.htm

Featured Products

Vitamin D3 Capsules

Vitamin D is necessary for utilization of calcium and phosphorus and in many ways acts as a hormone. The two most important forms of vitamin D are cholecalciferol (D3), which is derived from our own cholesterol and ergocalciferol (D2), a plant analogue derived from the diet. The cholecalciferol supplied by the Life Extension Buyers Club is synthetic, but its form is identical to that which is derived from cholesterol and synthesized by sunlight on the skin. Cholecalciferol Vitamin D is essential for bone growth and maintenance of bone density.

https://www.lifeextension.com/newshop/items/item00251.html

5-Loxin®

The typical American diet is loaded with foods that contain arachidonic acid (like egg yolk, red meat, poultry, and dairy products) or stimulate the production of excess arachidonic acid in the body (foods rich in high-glycemic carbohydrates, saturated fats, and omega-6 fatty acids).

Scientific studies show that, along with normal aging, excess arachidonic acid ignites a biochemical cascade that increases levels of the 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) enzyme, which can induce undesirable effects in cells throughout the body. This cascade culminates in the excess accumulation of leukotriene B4, a proinflammatory compound that attacks the joints, the arterial wall, and other tissues.

https://www.lifeextension.com/newshop/items/item00939.html

Life Extension magazine

Late-breaking news and more on the Life Extension Website, by Dave Tuttle

After nearly a year of intensive effort, a vastly improved Life Extension website is now up and running. This new-generation site offers daily access to at least four late-breaking news items—information that can make a huge difference to your health.

The revamped website also offers a variety of other useful features—everything from access to articles in previous issues of Life Extension magazine to on-line purchasing using our completely new, state-of-the-art shopping cart system.

https://www.lifeextension.com/magazine/mag2006/dec2006_report_web_01.htm

If you have questions or comments concerning this issue or past issues of Life Extension Update, send them to [email protected] or call 1-800-678-8989.

For longer life,

Dayna Dye
Editor, Life Extension Update
[email protected]
954 766 8433 extension 7716
www.lifeextension.com

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